Historical Biography/Memoir

Imagine if you will that you are walking along the streets of your town. You’re young, healthy, able to work. You show up for a job each day, hang out with your friends on the weekends, maybe go see your mom on Sundays to get your laundry done and have a home cooked meal. You run your errands after work, drop off your Amazon returns at the post office, hit the liquor store, stop to buy some milk and bread. Life is normal, right? Just as you’re paying for your groceries, you and everybody around you is jumped by unknown assailants. The healthy and young are sorted out. The children, the females of breeding age, and the males who can do manual labor are separated from the aged and sick. You may very well being standing there with your family or your friends, and suddenly strangers appear and start picking out the best of the gathered prospects. Your children are ripped from your arms, your spouse is taken one way and you are taken another. Some people are killed outright in front of your very eyes. Off you go to parts unknown, and who knows where the rest of the people you know will end up. You are allowed no communication and have no way to ever find the ones you love or even know what happened to them. Most likely, you’ll never see them or your homeland again. You are forced into permanent cuffs and made to work as a slave for the rest of your life. Just like that. I can’t even wrap my mind around it.

This is the story we all think we know, but most of us think about it in the abstract. We know groups of people were enslaved, that slavery was a horrible blight on the history of humanity, and that it was fairly recent in American history when you compare us to the thousands of years of other civilizations. We know that slaves influenced music and food and other parts of American culture, especially in the Deep South. There are, of course, existing slave narratives telling the stories of the individuals who lived through such a horrific experience and lived to see themselves set free, but few are as engaging and personal as Hurston’s account in Barracoon.

Cudjo Lewis shared his story with Zora Neale Hurston in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Hurston was a fledgling anthropologist at the beginning of her career, an unknown name sent to interview Lewis by famed anthropologist Frank Boas. Lewis was 86-years-old and living in Alabama.

Look at this man’s face and imagine him as a young man, living his daily life. Kossula, the real name of Cudjo Lewis, was in his village admiring the young women and going about his daily routine on the day before his life was changed forever. He had been training as a warrior, his father was an officer to the King, his village had laws and traditions and a rich culture. He had a good and full life. The next day, another tribe raided his village, massacred many, and sold the survivors to slave traders. Kossula, about 19 at the time, watched as his village was overrun by the men of the neighboring King. This King dealt in slavery with white traders. Kossula was in the midst of terror, watching as people’s heads were ripped off, faces were ripped off, his own King was beheaded and much of this was done by women warriors. Kossula never saw his family again and was taken away, marched for days, and taken to a barracoon which was a holding area for slaves. Kossula had never slept on the ground before, he cried for his parents, and watched as the other villages either fought or surrendered to the King who conquered his people. Kossula boarded the last slave trading ship, the Clotilda, and headed for a strange land called America. His clothes were stripped off, and he was displayed to prospective buyers. He had never gone without clothing before and was aghast that he was assumed to be a savage because of a nakedness that was not his choice.

It’s an incredible story, and Hurston writes in the vernacular that was common practice at the time. She didn’t just interview Lewis, she built a relationship with him by taking him peaches or watermelon, insecticide for mosquitoes, or helped him clean his church. Sometimes Lewis didn’t feel like talking about his past, and he and Hurston either sat in companionable silence or talked of other things. I recommend the audiobook because I think the flow of language is wonderful – you’re right there on his porch, eating sweet, cold melon and hearing his stories of an incredible life.

If they are any blessings to take away, Lewis at least seemed to have happy memories for his first two decades of life. As much as Lewis suffered once he came to America, his remembrances of his old life and the life he should have had were still hard for him to bear when he had his conversations with Hurston. As this NPR article mentions, “That pain stayed with Lewis for his whole life… So often in the interview process, he would weep, or he would be so lost in the memories of what happened to him, he could not speak.” Lewis was a slave for five and a half years before slaves were freed. He worked hard to build a life for himself afterwards, married and had children, suffered indignities and slights, and had the grievous misfortune to suffer the loss of four of his children. His story breaks your soul and then heals it again with the humbleness of his own.

There’s a link to a news story on Lewis’s legacy here and another article on the history of Barracoon’s publication here. Do yourself a favor and read this book.

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Book From Your Childhood

If you asked me who my spirit animal would be in children’s literature, one of the contenders would definitely be Ramona Quimby. She is fearless and creative and just totally full of…imagination. Not the word you thought I would use! (And that word would also fit.) Anywho, Ramona was hilarious and I admired her ingenuity in problem solving. Like that one time she lost her shoe and used paper and tape and a stapler, I think, to make another one so she could get through the school day. Who would think of that? She was the bane of her big sister, Beezus, and her parents were often at a loss to understand her, but they all loved her and everything was okay in the end.

Really, I also would have said that I read all of the Ramona books as a kid but looking back, I think I might have just read the same one over and over – Ramona the Brave. Apparently, I was unaware that there were more? Or, maybe I just couldn’t tear myself away from the book I loved for something I might not like as well? I was that kid who read the same books over and over if I loved them, so who knows.

Regardless, I decided to go back and read through the series from beginning to end and that’s when I started to realize that my Ramona experience was limited. I also realized that I might not have loved Ramona as much if I had started with Beezus and Ramona, because little 4-year-old Ramona was a terror!

If you haven’t been exposed to Ramona before, have patience. Beezus and Ramona may not endear her to you but stick with the series! Beezus is the central character in this book, not Ramona. Beezus is really named Beatrice, but Ramona couldn’t say that, so Beezus became the go to moniker for her. Beezus was named after her mother’s younger sister, the cool aunt who teaches fourth grade and drives a yellow convertible. Beezus is almost 10 years old. Ramona is four. (You can imagine some of the trouble right there.) Beezus and Ramona’s mom is a homemaker and dad works – pretty typical for the day when this was published back in 1955.

Being nine, Beezus has a lot more maturity than Ramona. She is quiet and responsible and aware of how to act in polite society. Ramona is the opposite in every way. Beezus does some basic sewing and likes to read and enjoys playing checkers with her neighbor, Henry Huggins, who comes over for the occasional visit. Ramona can’t stand to not be the center of attention and she especially wants the attention of big sis Beezus. Ramona goes out of her way to do the most outrageous things she can think of, like coloring on every page of a library book so she can keep it forever (unconcerned that her mother has to actually pay for the book); invites a bunch of kids over for a party (without asking her mom first); and eating exactly one bite out of half a crate of apples (without a care that she’s wasting the food). Again, she’s four and any attention seems like good attention. Poor Beezus, though. She always seems to be the most affected by Ramona’s behavior and Ramona is never regretful of what she does. She’s regretful when she’s sent to her room or ignored by her family, but not seemingly regretful of her actions.

Beezus is feeling guilty for not liking or even loving her sister when Ramona acts bad but she does also have times when she enjoys doing activities with Ramona. The big denouement comes on the day of Beezus’s tenth birthday. Ramona ruins not one, but two birthday cakes and Beezus has reached her limit. Beezus confesses to her mom and aunt that sometimes she doesn’t love Ramona. Beezus is ready for a shocked lecture from her two favorite women, and is shocked herself when the adult sisters laugh and laugh and confess that they had many times growing up where they didn’t love each other either and that it’s a perfectly normal part of growing up with a sibling. Beezus is so relieved and enjoys being regaled with stories of her mom and her aunt as children and the irritating things they used to do to each other. Beezus has hope that she and Ramona will grow up and be able to look back on their own childhood with the same love and laughter she sees from her aunt and mother. (Spoiler alert – the third birthday cake survives!)

From the three different covers shown, you can tell that the story of these two siblings remains relevant to generations of audiences. Ramona craves attention from her beloved big sister and Beezus admires and is jealous of Ramona’s free spirit and imagination. After Beezus and Ramona, author Beverly Cleary changes the focus of the series from Beezus to Ramona. As the character grows up, she doesn’t slow down any but she does mature as most children do. Cleary is still hailed as one of America’s most loved children’s authors and her series about the Quimby girls and Henry Huggins cross over frequently.

Cleary tuned 100 a couple of years ago and you can watch an interview here. She is still delightful and you can see the impish Ramona peeking through in her personality. For Cleary’s 102nd birthday, Vox took a look at Ramona’s “enduring appeal.” Cleary’s website lists her books, and many of them may be favorites of yours. If you. notice the image at the top of the post, you’ll see that it’s the cover of an audio book. Not surprising since I mention that I listen to audio books a lot, and this one does not disappoint. It’s read by the fabulous Stockard Channing which is an extra special treat because I’m a huge fan of hers, too!

Ramona and company are literature legends and I would highly recommend them to you and yours. There’s a great article from NPR here that lauds Ramona (during a publicity blitz for the feature film based on the books) and Mental Floss has some fun facts on Ramona here.

Novella with Protagonist of Color

Sorry, y’all! I’ve been trying and trying to read another book that has great reviews but I just can’t get into it. I decided to take a break from it and discovered this gem of a novella! Books come to you when the time is right, and the time was right for me to meet Binti.

Let’s talk about Binti, the accidental heroine of our story. (Aren’t they all accidental heroines in some form or fashion? I digress…) One of 10 kids, Binti is a 16-year-old Himba girl who leaves home in the dead of night to fulfill her dream of attending the renowned Oomza University. She boards a transporter that will take her to an interplanetary ship on its way to University.

Family is everything to the Himba and they are known for being reclusive, not mixing with other races or communities. Desert dwellers, the Himba love their land and go so far as to use it to cleanse and purify their bodies, continually marking themselves with the red clay of their region. Binti quickly feels conspicuous for the first time in her life, never having been away from her home city before. Her hair is thick and wild and plaited, dressed in the sweet oil and clay mixture from her land; she jingles from the steel rings she wears around her ankles (protection from snake bites); her clothing is different and suited for hot desert terrain. She experiences disdain and lots of side-eye from the others she while on her journey to her transport.

What would push Binti to leave home in such a devious manner? Her planetary exams score was so high in mathematics that she was admitted to Oomza University with a full scholarship no less. Even though she would be the first of her people to venture out and attend the University, her family is up in arms and don’t consider that to be an option. Knowing that pleading and reason are useless, Binti steals away in the dead of night to make her way through space to search out a new future for herself. Binti heartbreakingly knows her family will be furious and probably never accept her again, but she boldly follows the path she feels is best for her. You get a real sense of Binti weighing options that are not ideal and trying to make the best decision that will be true and honest and just, which bodes well for future events in the story

As Binti journeys with a space ship full of professors and other students to the University, she makes friends and learns to make her way in such a different culture. As she’s sitting in the lunch hall with her squad, admiring her crush, she is suddenly covered in a spray of blood. Her companion has just been killed by a member of the Meduse race who have surprisingly transported onto the ship. Everyone is killed but Binti (for reasons I won’t disclose here), and she is terrorized for several days as she hides in her room. Turns out, the Meduse race have a huge grudge to pick with Oomza University – an event that really has nothing to do with Binti and the other passengers. They are unfortunate collateral damage in a plan of revenge and possible war.

Binti and the Meduse finally find a way to communicate and Binti has to decide if she can rise above the need for revenge for a greater good or if the loss of her new tribe of people is too heart-wrenching to overcome. Either decision will come at great personal cost to Binti.

I really liked this book. I listened to the audio and the narrator has a lovely accent and inflection that drops you right into Binti’s point of view. The math and science emphasis is huge. Binti’s hair, for example, is braided according to a mathematical code that was designed by her father and identifies her place in the lineage of her family. Binti is a brilliant mathematician and comes from a long line of people who study the secrets of the universe, although the Himba study the universe from an internal rather than external perspective. It also has a feel of Star Trek about it with the disparate groups of people trying to come to terms with each other and live companionably, if not exactly friendly.

The book is short (the audio is only two and a half hours), so it can easily be finished in an afternoon, and is the first in a series. The shortness of the story by no means impacts the depth and is winner of both Hugo and Nebula awards for best novella. The author, Nnedi Okorafor, is American with Nigerian roots. No moss grows under her feet, and she has an impressive list of works before and after Binti. She has a Ted Talk here about sci-fi stories and the imagining of a future Africa, and also has a new comic series coming out about Black Panther’s Shuri. Another novel, Who Fears Death, has been optioned as an HBO series. It’s been in my TBR pile for awhile and may have to now move to the top!

Book About A Bookstore or Library

Ummmmm…I am kind of at a loss for words on this one. The Bookshop started out as something I normally really like. A widow decides to open a bookstore in her tiny English village. I thought it would have some humor, some quirky characters, some very British perseverance in the face of adversity – and it did. It also had an overwhelmingly sad ending that I really didn’t expect and, as it turns out, I learned that people are just mean and you shouldn’t bother trying to bring some light into people’s worlds because they simply won’t appreciate it. Does that sound dark? It’s how I felt after listening to this book.

It’s 1959, and Florence Green has decided to open the only bookshop in her little seaside town. She picks an abandoned property that’s been vacant for seven years and falling into decay. Oh, and it’s haunted, a fact which plays a minimal role in the story. Florence fixes the place up, orders her inventory, and opens her business. Her main nemesis is the local rich lady, Mrs. Gamart, who, some day, planned to use the same property for a center for the arts and begins to put the squeeze on Florence to move out and move on. Never mind that this property has been vacant the last seven years and no move was made before then to do anything with it, or that the entire small village knew for a few months of Florence’s plan to buy and refurbish the place for a bookshop business. Mrs. Gamart is peeved that her pet project has been snatched away from her. Jealousy is the crux of poor Florence’s downfall.

The book is really too short to give much more of the plot without giving every spoiler. I wanted this book to be one of those cozy English village stories where everything works out in the end and this was not that story. However, it was very well- written and had parts that made me laugh out loud. It was charming in many ways and the fact that it didn’t meet my expectations was no fault of the book. It did feel like it skimmed over much of the story and characters because of the short length, so it seemed more novella than novel. I would have like more depth. As a parable for spectacular failure despite one’s optimism in life, it hit its mark.

As I said, it’s a short book. Amazon lists it at 192 pages and the running time on the audio was just under four hours. It was short-listed for the Man Booker Prize back in 1978 when it was first published, but didn’t win. I’ve included this review from Publisher’s Weekly that lauds the book’s bleakness and social message and I found another great review/discussion here. Author Penelope Fitzgerald did win the Booker Prize the next year for her novel Offshore. You can read more about Fitzgerald here.

A movie is due out in August 2018 which I didn’t realize until I finished the book and was doing my research. I’ve included a trailer here. It has already been released in other parts of the world and the reviews for the film are as mixed as reviews for the book. This link is to an article in Variety and I’ve included a few reviews below from Rotten Tomatoes.

I didn’t dislike the book and plan to explore some of Fitzgerald’s other titles. She is a new name to me. I’ll also catch the movie at some point to see how it holds up. I would recommend this book overall, just beware that it’s not what you might expect! Really, though, when is life ever what we expect? And that is the crux of this story.

Book Based on the Cover

Never judge a book by its cover, right? But we do. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, but we still do it. In this book, they also judge a person based on their cover – tattoos on the skin, to be more exact. An appropriate book for the category, now that I think of it! It’s hard to see the details of the cover in this photo, but it’s flooded with coppery foiled images all over, much like a variety of tattoos. It’s really gorgeous and, honestly, what drew my attention to a book in a genre filled with imaginative covers.

Ink is a young adult dystopian fantasy, a genre I’m already over in so many ways. The protagonist, Leora, has just suffered the loss of her father. She and her mother are grieving but still have to forge their way through everyday life. Leora is about to graduate and has missed quite a bit of school while caring for her dying father. Her best friend, Verity, helps her with her studies and the two graduate with high marks, allowing them to obtain the jobs they’ve dreamed of for so long – Verity in the government, and Leora as an inker (aka tattoo artist in our world).

So, what’s so fancy and important about being a tattoo artist? In the world of Ink, people are marked with tattoos to recognize the events of their lives. Some tattoos are mandatory, like a name at two days old, a family tree on one’s back, lines and other symbols for accolades, accomplishments, or crimes. Other tattoos are self-chosen by individuals to reflect personal events or interests, and the inkers have to be talented and intuitive to bring all of these images together so that one’s life story can be read on the skin. It’s a really unique idea and I like that part a lot.

This is where it gets weird for me and I couldn’t shake the creepy factor for the rest of the book. When a person dies, like Leora’s father, the body is taken to a Flayer. This Flayer removes the tattoos carefully from the body and the skin remnants are stretched and bound like a page, and compiled in a book. So, the family has a book of the life of the deceased person and can remember them through the tattoos on the skin. The book as a whole is judged by the government and, if the person lived a good enough life, the book is placed in a library to be remembered. If the judgement doesn’t come out well, the book is burned and the person is forgotten. Turns out, Leora’s father is not who she thought he was and his book is brought up short in the judging process and burned. Leora finds that many people in her life are not who they seemed and she spends the remainder of the book trying to sort things out.

Because of who Leora’s father turned out to be, certain factions have been waiting for her to grow up and be used as a political pawn. The neighboring “enemy” are the Blanks, a group of people so full of shame and deviousness that they refuse to have anything tattooed on their skin and are surely working at this very moment to take over Leora’s world. So claims the government, anyway. There are the usual tropes of a young girl being plucked from obscurity and used in the name of rebellion and a 1984-style government that has fooled the people into believing everything they say. It’s done to death at this point. While I liked the idea of the ink telling the story of a life, the peeling off of the skin to be preserved in a book is just something I couldn’t get over. The end of the book was also very rushed and jumbled to me, with Leora vacillating very quickly from hating everyone who had deceived her and turning pro-government, to rebuking all of that and landing on the side of the rebellion. I just didn’t buy it and really never got on board for caring for Leora as a character. This is the first in a new series and one that I probably won’t be revisiting.

As always, read it for yourself and make your own conclusions. There are other reviews here, so you can see what others like and dislike about it. I found his link to an interview with Alice Broadway in The Guardian where she discusses her split with her faith that inspired Leora’s story, and another interview here where she discusses her writing process. I’m also including a link to some of the best in he YA dystopian genre. A few of them have been on my radar for awhile, and I’ll probably go ahead and read them despite being burned out on the category. You never know when the next great read will present itself!

Book About Death or Grief

This is one of those categories which I consider to be an interpretive category. If you want to delve into a nonfiction work on actual death and grieving, there are plenty of books out there. If you want a fiction book about death, go find the latest Nicholas Sparks. For me, I didn’t want either of those options. I mean, this book is kind of about death and grief. Ghosts and spirits who communicate from the other side, right? And those who communicate with them and pass on messages to loved ones? That counts. So says me.

Jenniffer Weigel of I’m Spiritual, Dammit fame has collected a series of interviews with some of the most noteworthy names currently in the field of spiritual beliefs. You can find out more about her at her website here.

Weigel interviews the cream of the current crop in the medium and psychic field: Rebecca Rosen, Caroline Myss, Linda Howe, Thomas John, Echo Bodine, Michael Bodine, Maureen Hancock, Concetta Bertolucci, Paul Selig, Margie Hughes, Denise Guzzardo, and Jorianne The Coffee Pyschic (really!). These folks deal in channeling spirits, ghost hunting, readings, psychic connections, and almost any other niche in this subject matter that you can think of. They are authors, speakers, teachers, and considered experts in their respective fields.

Each of the interviews is interesting and unique in its own way. Rather than ask the same series of questions to each person, the interviews have taken place on the podcast at different times or at an event where there is audience interaction. The interviewees talk about a variety of topics related to their specialty, including how some of them started out on this path. It makes for an interesting listen. I’m part skeptic but part wannabe believer, and many of the interviewees are very well-spoken and thoughtful in their answers. They get that people scoff at their work and often agree that it may not be for everyone. I’m not saying their aren’t a few eye-rolling moments in the interviews, but many of them communicate a belief in a higher power or the laws of attraction thinking where the energy you put out feeds the energy that’s is attracted to you (and whatever form that energy may take is another matter).

Death plays a big part in this type of work, right? Spirits can’t communicate with you unless they are … spirits. Am I right? Depending on your personal belief system about an afterlife, it may be comforting to you to know that your dearly departed can send messages or look after you and your family, that these spirits can guide you through life and are waiting for you when you cross over. But even if you are a skeptic, you might give this a listen, even if it’s only a few of the interviews. There are good points made about positivity and the kind treatment of others and other positive messages that are good for anyone to hear. Personally, death is a big question mark. What happens to the soul? Will I really be able to see my loved ones restored to a happy, healthy version of themselves? Or, do they die and that’s it, the spark that made them a human being is just gone, never to be seen again? I don’t like that scenario and I choose to think that, in some form of an afterlife, that I will be reunited with them. Therefore, I’m curious about all viewpoints on the matter and am drawn to subjects like this. I don’t want to know about the stages of dying or read a tear-jerker about someone’s death. I want to explore the pseudo-science and hope for more.

This is available in book form, but I listened to the audio version. I don’t know how the book reads, but, since we’re talking about interviews, the audio format was my preference. It’s like listening to a series of podcasts and a great choice for a quick fix on your daily commute.

There is an interview here with Weigel about this book and Weigel’s interview with psychic medium Susan Rowlan (not included in the book) here.

Thriller

Ellie Mack is an average 15-year-old girl in a British upper-middle class family, the youngest of three children and a perfect child according to her mom, Laurel. But, one day, Ellie goes missing and her family falls apart. Laurel is hit especially hard, and she ends up losing her marriage and is painfully distant from her remaining son and daughter. Ten years pass by and a clue finally turns up in Ellie’s disappearance and the Mack family gets the closure they’ve needed. Or do they?

Laurel, finally knowing Ellie is truly dead and not a runaway as the police suspected, has a sort of closure and begins to slowly pull herself out of her deep depression. She becomes more aware of letting her life slip away these past ten years and, one day, by chance, meets a man in a cafe. This man is charming and fun and Laurel slowly begins to date and to live and to start making things right in her own life. This man, though, has a daughter who, at times, looks exactly like…her dead daughter, Ellie. She also finds some other oddities and parallels between her life and her new boyfriend. Things that make you go hmmmmmm…

I’ll leave you with that for the moment, but there may be semi-spoilers in some of the text ahead. I would say this book is good. Not great, but really, solidly good. Fairly early in the book, you can start to suspect what transpires. However, I was interested enough in the characters that I didn’t mind knowing how I thought it would end. I just wanted to see how it would get there. I do think that’s the author’s intent because the clues she leaves are big ones. It’s not designed to be a twisty-turny plotted book and that’s okay. Not everything needs to be. It’s still a good read and a something that keeps you interested throughout the book even as you start to put the pieces together. A few plot twists happen, but those are more related to the personal lives of the family members and not the overall whodunnit of the novel.

Things that made me go hmmmmmm about this book:

  • Laurel keeps dating a dude she thinks may have some connection to her daughter’s death, no matter how vague or innocent? Not just dating, but sleeping with him, spending the night, getting closer to his children – y’all, yuck.
  • When she starts to have these suspicions, she doesn’t bring anybody else in on it? She at least texts someone about where she’s going towards the end of the book, but still. You have these growing suspicions and you don’t phone a friend, your ex-husband, the police? Even in a fictional world, characters know bad things happen and Laurel knows this all too well. It didn’t jive with me.
  • A little awkwardly, about half-way through the book, you start getting a POV from another character. It sounds as if it’s a letter or a journal, definitely a confession, but nothing every really comes of it except that the reader is let in on what actually happened to Ellie. It would have been nice for that to be a document that came to light at some point. As it was, it interrupted the story some for me and left a gap that needed to be filled.
  • It seemed like Ellie could have overpowered her captor at some point in the story; she wasn’t tied up or restrained for the majority of her time, although she was locked in a rom (with a window). I didn’t fully buy into that. You’ve got a young, healthy girl who can’t get past someone who doesn’t seem to be more powerful than her. There needed to be more psychological oomph or an explanation of the captor’s strength/control. It made me not as sympathetic with Ellie at that part of the story – not that she deserved to be where she was, mind you. We’ve all seen those horrific and inexcusable real-life stories of young women held in captivity by a variety of means. I’m just saying that the author kind of glazed over the emotional/psychological/physical control issue as to why Ellie seemed so complacent. We also have an unreliable narrator for this portion and only a partial glimpse of Ellie’s POV, so maybe something was lost in translation.
  • There are people in this book who shouldn’t be smart enough to get away with these crimes, but do. There’s very little in this book about police procedure and more about how Ellie’s disappearance affected her mom and the subsequent breakdown of the family. The police mostly seem to focus on Ellie as a runaway, so we don’t get much of a sense of how the initial investigation was handled and whether they should have picked up on clues or whether they were thorough and just couldn’t have known the full set of circumstances as sometimes happens. The guilty are not exactly criminal masterminds, but are definite creepy as hell.
  • The end is satisfactory on all of the loose ends; however, you still don’t get the police -style follow up you do in some thrillers. The focus is still very much on the family, which is fine, but I would have liked a little more on the police or public reaction to the big reveal. Instead, we get a soft wrap-up and only allusions to the aftermath.

All in all, it was a good tale. I would recommend this for an “in-between books” book, a quick summer read, or something middle-of-the-road for a book club. If you’ve read it, I would love to hear your thoughts on the plot points I mentioned above! I’m including a review from Kirkus Books and an interview with author Lisa Jewell.